1. Format your response so that it’s easy to read on a screen. Do not write email using very long sentences, which are lengthy horizontally. Each line must be short. Ideally, write 5-6 words in each line only and not more than that.

 

 

2. Make sure the subject line is concise and meaningful to the recipient…not just a generic
“Response from Marketing Team” But also be careful that it doesn’t look like spam.

 

 

3. Have one subject per paragraph. Mention this separately by blank lines, so that its easy to read and understand.

 

 

4. Be brief. Use as few words as possible to convey your message. More is not better when

it comes to email. An email is not perceived as an electronic letter.

 

 

5. Use simple, declarative sentences. Write for a third or fourth grade audience,

particularly if you’re creating templates that are sent automatically. You do not know the

education level of your sender or the sender’s level of comfort with the English language.

 

 

6. Be sensitive to the tone of the original email. If the sender is upset because of an error on

your part, acknowledge the error. Clearly state what you are doing to correct the situation.

 

 

7. Make sure you answer all the questions posed in the original inquiry. A partial answer

frustrates the sender and results in additional contacts. It also makes the company sending

the response look inept.

 

 

8. Make it clear what actions you will be taking next and when the writer can expect the

next contact from you.

 

 

9. Don’t ask for an order number/case number or any old information which you remember out of your mind only when one is included in the original email…sounds pretty basic, but sometimes people miss very obvious info in email.

 

 

10. Don’t just tell the sender to go to your web site. In many cases, they have already been to

the web site and couldn’t find the answers they were looking for. If you want them to go

back to the web site, provide a direct link to the exact information the reader needs.